Chia Seeds - Salvia hispanica Seeds - 2000 Seed Count
Chia Seeds - Salvia hispanica Seeds - 2000 Seed CountChia Plant

Chia Seeds – 2k Seeds (1 Tablespoon)

$1.00

Chia Seeds – 2K Seeds (1 Tablespoon)
NOTE: We test all the seeds we collect and therefore have plenty of starter plants. If you are interested in purchasing a starter plant for any of our items please contact us and we will sell you some of these great plants.

Chia (Salvia hispanica), also known as Mexican Chia or Salba, has a long history of use in South America and was a major food crop in pre-Columbian civilisations, particularly favoured by the Aztecs.

Health benefits

Chia comes from the Mayan word meaning ‘something that makes you strong’ and the health benefits of this plant have been known for a very long time. Chia seeds are gluten-free and contain essential fatty acids (including omega-3), protein, antioxidants, phytonutrients, vitamins, minerals and fibre. Chia are known to stabilise blood sugar levels as well as reduce cholesterol and blood pressure.

Growing Chia

Chia is an annual herbaceous plant growing to over a metre in height. Plants can be sown in March or April (now!) under cover and seeds should germinate within a couple of weeks. Chia can also be sown in the ground outside in May but this may reduce the chances of them flowering and setting seed (they may not anyway). Plants produce a prolific amount of leaves and should flower between July and August. They are frost tender and prefer a dry sunny position in the garden with just enough, but not too much, water. In the wild Chia have adapted well to arid conditions and areas of low soil fertility. Chia is also known as a ‘fire following’ plant and thrives after foliage in the growing area has been burnt down.

Our seeds were raw and organic from a raw food supplier (can’t remember which one) and were sown in March in pots and planted out amongst the water hungry cucumbers (not a good idea in hindsight) just after the last frosts. Plants were quite fragile and side stems broke off easily particularly during windy weather. In the end, the main stem had to be heavily staked and tied to stop it falling over.They did not flower (groan!) so we didn’t obtain any seeds. This is really what we wanted and so were very disappointed. On the plus side these plants produce a massive amount of leaves, which have their own health benefits.

In stock

SKU: CTS-CHIASEEDS-012016 Categories: ,

Product Description

Chia Seeds – 2K Seeds (1 Tablespoon)
NOTE: We test all the seeds we collect and therefore have plenty of starter plants. If you are interested in purchasing a starter plant for any of our items please contact us and we will sell you some of these great plants.

Chia (Salvia hispanica), also known as Mexican Chia or Salba, has a long history of use in South America and was a major food crop in pre-Columbian civilisations, particularly favoured by the Aztecs.

Health benefits

Chia comes from the Mayan word meaning ‘something that makes you strong’ and the health benefits of this plant have been known for a very long time. Chia seeds are gluten-free and contain essential fatty acids (including omega-3), protein, antioxidants, phytonutrients, vitamins, minerals and fibre. Chia are known to stabilise blood sugar levels as well as reduce cholesterol and blood pressure.

Growing Chia

Chia is an annual herbaceous plant growing to over a metre in height. Plants can be sown in March or April (now!) under cover and seeds should germinate within a couple of weeks. Chia can also be sown in the ground outside in May but this may reduce the chances of them flowering and setting seed (they may not anyway). Plants produce a prolific amount of leaves and should flower between July and August. They are frost tender and prefer a dry sunny position in the garden with just enough, but not too much, water. In the wild Chia have adapted well to arid conditions and areas of low soil fertility. Chia is also known as a ‘fire following’ plant and thrives after foliage in the growing area has been burnt down.

Our seeds were raw and organic from a raw food supplier (can’t remember which one) and were sown in March in pots and planted out amongst the water hungry cucumbers (not a good idea in hindsight) just after the last frosts. Plants were quite fragile and side stems broke off easily particularly during windy weather. In the end, the main stem had to be heavily staked and tied to stop it falling over.They did not flower (groan!) so we didn’t obtain any seeds. This is really what we wanted and so were very disappointed. On the plus side these plants produce a massive amount of leaves, which have their own health benefits.

Additional Information

Weight 4 oz